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Summer 2014 Learning Lab Group Program

Summer 2014 Learning Lab Group Program

Access to Better Communication is offering a Learning Lab group program for the summer 2014. This group will work to create better learners and students by using visual strategies to develop improved executive functioning, reading, and writing while interacting with peers in a small group setting. Executive Functioning (E.F.) represents a group of skills that an individual uses to better focus on and process multiple sets of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. Students who have E.F. deficits (also referred to as Executive Dysfunction) demonstrate weaknesses in areas including writing, organization, time management, initiation of tasks, and planning, which impact overall academic performance and activities of daily living.

Focused topics will include:

  • Initiation/planning for writing: We have discovered that many students with E.F. challenges have difficulty when assigned a writing task. “Getting started” can sometimes be the hardest part. These students struggle with reading a prompt, steps for prewriting, developing outlines, and writing the introduction.
  • Self-awareness and monitoring in group tasks: By participating in a small group setting, we are able to incorporate aspects of “Social Thinking®” with these traditionally “academic only” students. The students will learn how to monitor one’s self for “time robbers,” how to participate cooperatively in a group, and how to monitor one’s own attention to group discussions and projects. Many teachers are reporting this to be a tough skill for students, particularly those with EF difficulties who also have a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD.
  • Time management/organization for long-term projects and group tasks: Time management skills will be targeted through small group and individual tasks, as well as project planning. Students will learn how to estimate the amount of time it takes to complete an assignment, break the assignment into smaller steps, and execute those steps within a deadline so that they may complete assignments and projects from start to finish.
  • Reading comprehension and note taking: Students will learn to improve reading comprehension through strategies such as “visual mapping,” “information chunking,” “if/then thinking,” and summary writing. Students with E.F. weaknesses often have difficulty being concise and narrowing in on the most important information.

In summary, ABC’s Learning Lab group program is an opportunity for students to develop greater independence, organization, and time management skills over the summer that will be applicable in the academic setting. Opportunities for further enhancing these skills throughout the school year will be discussed at the end of this 8 week program.

For more information regarding ABC’s Learning Lab group program, please contact Kelli Renfro, Speech-Language Pathologist at (225) 930-0208 or email her directly at kelli@abclouisiana.com.

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Have a Child With Autism? Learn How LEGO’s Can Help Here!

Having a child with autism is hard. Trying to connect with them though might be the hardest part. In order to help you out we found this article on how using LEGO’s could help. We hope it helps you create connections with your child!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Invented by Ole Kirk Kristiansen, the family owned LEGO® Group was founded in 1932, much to the delight of millions of children and adults throughout the world. What we recognize as the modern day LEGO® brick was introduced in 19581. LEGO® combines two Danish words. “leg godt,” which means play wel1. The fundamental premise of LEGO® Therapy is to do just that. So, let’s get our bricks on and talk about LEGO® Therapy through the lens of occupational therapy.

Fundamentals
The ability to form meaningful and self-fulfilling interpersonal relationships is closely aligned with social communication skills. Social communication skills help people function successfully in their daily lives. Individuals with ASD, at varying degrees, lack effective social communication skills. This includes theory of mind; recognition that there are other ways of looking at the world than through one’s own lens, poor eye contact, and reciprocal communication. And, while there are many social skills interventions that are available for individuals with ASD, few lead to generalizable outcomes. What is learned in a structured social skills program often cannot be applied in the ‘real world.’ Enter LEGO® Therapy; a naturalistic intervention, that for many with ASD is a satisfying means to address social communication skills, and so much more. LEGO® Therapy captures a child’s intrinsic interests and builds (no pun intended) on a foundation of motivation and behavior change.

Using LEGO® as a therapeutic medium was first reported in the research literature by Dr. Daniel LeGoff in 2004. He was trying to provide effective social skills intervention for children with ASD with few positive outcomes. Many of the available programs were, in Dr. LeGoff’s words, uninteresting and lacking in intrinsic value for children. Equally as important, he felt the results of most social skills programs were not generalizable from one setting to another, that is, enabling the skills to transfer from classroom or clinic to the playground. Dr. LeGoff developed an intervention he called LEGO® Therapy to fill the void in effective social skills programs.

Process
LEGO® Therapy is far more than transforming a pile of LEGO® bricks into a completed project. It is a form of group play therapy with specific guidelines. For many reasons LEGO® Therapy is a successful social skills intervention for children and youth with ASD. While the sky is the limit in terms of what can be constructed from LEGOs® (have you seen entire cities constructed in miniature from LEGOs®?) they are a highly-structured and systematic toy. Structure and systematic materials appeal to many individuals with ASD. Because of the highly-structured and predictable nature of LEGO®, it is a desirable medium for children with ASD, particularly those who are more high functioning. So far, so good.

Engagement in construction activities, like LEGO® is second only to rule governed games in terms of effectively facilitating social interaction as compared to dramatic and functional play3. LEGO® Therapy is a successful intermediary to address social communication skills. In fact, research has found significant benefits associated with LEGO® Therapy. They include improved sustained initiation of social contact, improved length of social interaction, and reduced rigidity for children participating in LEGO® Therapy pre-treatment and compared to those who were on a waiting list to participate in LEGO® Therapy.

LEGO® Therapy provides natural reinforcement, as building is a highly desirable activity. The LEGO® Therapy process requires a division of labor, communication, rule setting, social engagement, and oh yes, is fun. LEGO® Therapy involves several roles for a group of three children to fulfill, which ideally shift within the course of a 60 minute session. The roles are engineer, supplier, and builder. The engineer directs and describes the instructions for the project. The supplier locates the correct pieces and passes them onto the builder. The builder puts the bricks together. In order for the project to go from bricks to final product, the three players must be able to communicate with each other, verbally or nonverbally, and to engage in joint attention, creativity, and problem solving. Rules also have to be established between the ‘players.’ They typically include construction rules; whomever breaks the project must fix it; and put pieces back from where you got them; conduct rules; no stepping on the LEGO®, furniture, or each other; and social rules; do not take LEGO® away from each other, do not tease, and no shouting. Typically parents are not involved in LEGO® Therapy, as they may disrupt (unintentionally!) the flow of the building process. Instead, parents may use LEGO® Therapy time to have their own informal support group.

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Looking for more resources on autism? Checkout this article about autism resources that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: https://www.autismparentingmagazine.com/lego-therapy-how-to-build-connections-with-autism-one-brick-at-a-time/

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Looking for Books to Aid in Speech Therapy? Try These!

Speech therapy is important. Different methods work better than others depending upon the child. In order to help you out with another method that could work well for your child we found this article with different books to try. We hope it helps!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

I love using children’s books in speech therapy.

Do you know that euphoric feeling when you finish a session and say, “Wow! That was terrific!” You feel that you thoroughly addressed your student’s goals and everyone was truly engaged. I often get that warm fuzzy when I use storybooks in our session. Whether used as the focal point, or jumping-off point, children’s literature is perfect for speech therapy.

Maybe you are just getting started incorporating literature into your sessions, or maybe you are already a fan, and would like to discover more great stories to use. Either way, I would love to share with you some of my very favorite storybooks and how I use them in speech therapy.

You can find storybooks for nearly any speech and language target,
but it can be a challenge searching and reading through them at the library, to find books for specific targets. I plan to make it easy for you, by regularly featuring storybooks that are terrific finds for therapy (And classroom too!).

My caseload consists of age 3 through fourth graders, so you can expect I will cover books for that age group. I will be covering lots of language ideas, and some articulation too!

Why use storybooks in speech therapy?
BUDGET-FRIENDLY– Storybooks are the perfect therapy tools, and so many are available for free in your school or local library. FREE. Yep, I like that. Especially since my speech therapy budget is “Ahem!” Well…. let’s just say non-existent!

SUPPORTS LITERACY– Books make including literacy in your therapy a breeze. Point out titles, text, story elements:characters, settings, problem, solution.

HIGH INTEREST– Great books captivate children’s interest, allow you to incorporate themes, favorite topics, and seasonal topics too.

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.speechsproutstherapy.com/2015/12/best-ever-books-for-speech-therapy.html

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Jessica Waggoner, M.A., CCC-SLP

Jessica Waggoner - Baton Rouge Speech Therapist at Access to Better CommunicationSpeech Language Pathologist

Jessica’s enthusiasm is contagious and her love for children is evident throughout her sessions. She enjoys providing clients with creative and exciting ways to increase communication. Jessica strongly believes in a whole language approach to therapy and provides each child with an individualized treatment plan; meeting your child where he/she is and helping him/her achieve his/her full potential.

Jessica has special interests in early intervention, Autism Spectrum Disorder, feeding disorders, children and infants with restrictive tongue and lip ties, children with Cerebral Palsy, and Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC).

Jessica graduated with a B.A. in Communication Sciences and Disorders and a M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology from Louisiana State University. Throughout her graduate program, Jessica worked with a variety of children with complex medical diagnoses and feeding difficulties.

Jessica has advanced training in pediatric and infant feeding therapy including posterior tongue-tie assessment and post-revision treatment. Continued education courses Jessica has attended include “TOTS: Tethered Oral Tissues Specialty Training” and “NICU Feeding and Swallowing: Assessment, Intervention and the Transition Home”.

Before joining the team at ABC, Jessica began her career in a private clinic treating children with a variety of communication and feeding disorders, co-treated with occupational therapists, and traveled to treat children at their schools. Jessica also has experience leading social language groups and early intervention pre-school language groups, as well as working with children who use AAC devices.

She holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) from the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) and is licensed by the Louisiana Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

Jessica resides in Baton Rouge and has family in the Hammond, Louisiana area. Her personal hobbies include cooking, playing the piano, biking, kayaking, and exploring the outdoors. She is currently working towards her scuba diving certification!

Access to Better Communication is privileged to have Jessica as a part of our team. Jessica’s personal and professional experience working with children with disabilities and their families is visible in her enthusiasm and creativity.

Kelli can be reached by phone at 225-930-0208 or via email on our contact us page.

We look forward to working with you and your child! We’re here to help!

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Have a Farm Set? Learn How to Use it in Speech Therapy Here!

Depending upon the type of child you have it can be difficult to get them interested in different activities to work on their speech goals. If you have a typical boy or a tom boy daughter then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article revolving about a farm set. We hope it helps you and your child have fun while reaching their speech goals!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge dyslexia! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

How can I target speech goals with a farm set?

Farm-themed speech therapy is engaging for the student and fun for the speech path. But with a wide range of needs on our caseloads, it can feel overwhelming. Here’s how to target lots of goals with a farm set.

Commenting
Commenting is an extremely tough skill for many preschoolers with expressive language delays. Do something totally absurd with one of the objects such as putting the cow on your head or the tractor on the cow, then say “uh-oh,” and point to it.

Absurdities usually get my students to attempt a comment!

Prepositions
My students struggle to correctly use preposition words including “up/down,” “above/under,” “in/on,” and “around,” but this farm set makes it easy to facilitate natural discussions about where things are. “The fence is around the stable” and “The horse is inside the stable” are a couple examples of how you can model these language concepts.

Answering questions
Without engaging materials it’s really tough to get kids to answer questions. Luckily, manipulables included in this farm set really get kids motivated to answer questions like “What is it?” “Who says ‘baa’?” “When do the animals sleep?” and “Why does a farmer use a tractor?”

There are so many options with a farm set to hit those common speech therapy goals. Now who is ready to say “moo?”

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: https://teachingtalking.com/5-speech-goals-to-target-with-a-farm-set/

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Ever Heard of Rory’s Story Cubes for Speech Therapy? Learn All About Them Here!

Teaching speech therapy is challenging. It’s hard on both the teacher and the student not to get bored from all the repetition. In order to help you out we found this article with a new way we hope will help you and your child!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

A popular game in the SLP word is Rory’s Story Cubes. I love using this game to work on storytelling, articulation, fluency, answering questions, and expanding utterance length. I find that I often have to notify the game so that my students can be successful independently. How do I do that?! I use the somebody-wanted-but-so-then strategy!!

I just take a dry erase marker and write right onto my therapy table! This way, a visual is right in the middle of the game, right in front of the students, so no excuses! I hate when students forget to use their visuals! By having the visual right in front of them, right before their very eyes, no excuses!!

Ok, so the visual is there, and my students are familiar with it by now, but if yours aren’t, you can review:

– “somebody” = main character
– “wanted” = what did they want
– “but” = what was their problem?
– “so” = what did they do to solve their problem?
– “then” = how did they solve the problem or how did the story end?

I have my students shake the dice right into the box to eliminate the dice spilling all over the place. When they open the box, they have to take at least 5 of the dice to make a story! I remind them, they can pretend some of the item are something similar!

We take turns by going around the table. I have the rest of the group listen and answer WH questions based on the stories heard to keep them responsible for paying attention. I sometimes keep score or reward bonus points if they use more than 5 dice. It all depends on the levels of the students!

By using this strategy, it helps students know how to organize their stories, keeps them on track, and helps them predict the answers to the questions!

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://speechtimefun.com/building-narrative-skills-with-rorys-story-cubes/

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Have an Older Child That Needs Help With Articulation? Learn How Here!

Articulation is a tricky thing to master. Not everyone masters all aspects of speech therapy at a young age. If your child is a little older and still needs some help with articulation then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article about helping your older child with articulation. We hope it helps!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge speech therapist! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

It can be so difficult to keep our older articulation students motivated. They have heard it all before, it is not new, they want to graduate from speech, but when they leave our rooms, they don’t seem to remember the strategies we taught them. Their teachers and parents don’t see the progress we claim to see when we drill. Once we get them mastering sounds in isolation, word, and sentence level, we need to work on conversation at a functional level. We need to mimic what they would need to be doing and feeling and experiencing outside of our speech rooms in order for it to be effective and relevant. I am going to share with you my favorite ways to work on carryover that don’t require much prep and are tons of fun.

ROLE PLAYING:

Act out the various social situations they might experience. Phone conversations, ordering food from a restaurant, ordering food in the cafeteria, conversation at recess or gym, debates, and even practice classroom conversations. What kind of social interactions would they have in a classroom? Presentations, asking and answering questions, group projects, and responding to text-based questions in a guided reading group situation. That is why you can even bring in academically relevant texts to practice reading out loud and answering questions.

You can use props and have students role play that they are going to a restaurant. No prep required since they can make their own menus that incorporate their target sounds! Just grab a file folder and done! This is great if it is a mixed group too because you can incorporate vocabulary too.

STORYTELLING:

“What did you do this weekend?” Our students struggle to be able to relay that information using their sounds especially when they are excited to tell us! Practice personal narratives and storytelling.

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Looking for more ways to help articulation? Checkout this article about articulation that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://speechtimefun.com/articulation-carryover-activities-for-older-speech-students/

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Learn How to Use Dry Erase Markers in Speech Therapy Here!

There are so many different tools that can be used to aid in speech therapy. One tool that you might not have thought of was dry erase markers. In order to help you out on how they can be used we found this article with different ideas. We hope they help!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge dyslexia assessment! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Need a quick visual? Students struggling to follow multi-step directions? Just grab a dry erase marker and you can easily write out or draw out visuals for your students that need the audio and visual cues!

Students bored of drilling activities? Just make a quick bulls eye on your therapy table and you are ready to go! Students can toss “coins” from dollar stores or any other small objects! They can earn points or even the amount of times they need to produce their articulation sounds! And yes…you can write on a therapy table with a dry erase marker and it will erase!

Student struggling to understand the steps to playing a game? Just give them visuals right there in front of them. Break the game down into steps!

Students not motivated to write? Don’t have time to make tons of photocopies? Want to be able to use color ink but not enough to make copies for your entire caseload? Just laminate enough for one group and you can use dry erase markers on it!

Don’t have time to laminate worksheets? Don’t want to write on your therapy table? You can purchase these dry erase sleeves! Just put a worksheet inside and students can write on it! This is great if you want to only make enough color copies for 1 group and use all day or if you have a graphic organizer that you want to use over and over for task cards.

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://speechtimefun.com/fun-ways-use-dry-erase-markers-speech/

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Looking for Book Suggestions for Your Child? Take a Look at These!

Reading is most of the time some thing you love, hate, or it’s just not your first choice to wind down. Regardless of what category your child falls into we found this article with different book ideas for you your child. We hope that you find some books that your child loves!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

This chapter of my Favorites is all about the preschooler and toddler books that make their little hearts happy. We have TONS of books. I probably should mention that most of the books we own are pre-loved or gifts and we try to let the boys help pick out the books at the thrift store so that they understand that there are lots of different books out there and they do get a say.

Sooo…let’s start this thing off with the King of children’s books….Seuss. This doctor really knows how to prescribe a daily dose of whimsy. We love these imaginative and poetic books. Will’s favorite is Great Day for Up but really you can’t go wrong with any of this collection.

One of the best ways to get age appropriate books is to bookmark Dr Seuss’ Bright and Early Books. I scored a bunch of these at a yard sale for ten cents a piece and they are worth their weight in copper.

Out of those, Will’s past favorites were Bears On Wheels and Inside Outside Upside Down. He also is on a dog kick lately…and he loves the silliness of Go Dog Go and The Digging-est Dog.

Speaking of trains…these Thomas books were part of a set Will got for Christmas last year and he is really into them this year. They are super short but each one has quick lessons (being careful, friendship, etc.) that are perfect for preschoolers. It comes with an electronic reader that can read the book to your little one but Will wore out the batteries so fast that we nixed it for good ole fashioned reading.

Weston LOVES Pooh books. I think it’s funny because Weston is like a human Pooh…he is a huge lover and his tummy generally rules his decision making. These are great board books for toddlers but have more than one word a page so practicing reading fast if your little one is impatient.

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.bowerpowerblog.com/2014/05/favorites-childrens-books/

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Looking for Books on Autism? Take a Look at This List!

Autism can be a big scary word. Knowing what to do or what not to do can be very difficult. If you’re looking for books to help you out then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article for you with a list of the best books on autism. We hope it helps!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge dyslexia assessment! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Even before my son was diagnosed with autism, I did a lot of reading about the diagnosis, either in the form of research or personal blog posts. But I absolutely prefer reading a physical book about the topic. In fact, I usually have a stack of four or five books about autism on my nightstand, just waiting for me to read. However, I end up reading one and then adding at least two more to the pile. So I don’t see my tower of autism books decreasing any time soon.

There’s just always so much to read and learn about when it comes to autism.

Thankfully, I can help narrow down your reading list by providing you with the absolute best books about autism. These books are my favorites and I hope they will become some of your favorites too.

These books are meant to inspire you, help you learn more about autism, give you insight into autism from an autistic person’s perspective, and to help your children learn about their own autism.

Please note that this list will be added to as I discover, read, and approve of new books about autism. I have only shared those that I have personally read and that I have found helpful, interesting, and informative.

– The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-Year-Old Boy with Autism by Naoki Higashida

This book is an absolute favorite of mine when it comes to understanding autism. The insight that this book provides is fabulous and it definitely changed how I view and understand autism. Highly recommend it! Plus, it’s a quick read and you can definitely read it from front to back in just a couple of hours.

– The Spark: A Mother’s Story of Nurturing, Genius, and Autism by Kristine Barnett

I remember reading this book shortly before pushing for a referral to get my son assessed for autism. There were so many pages in this book that seemed to be word-for-word accounts of things my son used to do. I cried some many times while reading this book, but it’s absolutely a must read for any parent, autism or not.

– Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism by Barry M. Prizant

This book is just wonderful! It will definitely make you rethink how you see autism. A must read for everyone, whether or not you know or work with someone who has autism.

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Looking for more autism resources? Checkout this article about autism resources that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.andnextcomesl.com/2015/11/best-autism-books.html

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Looking for Fun Sensory Ideas? Try These!

Sensory fun is an essential element of growing up as in encourages the development of their senses. Some parents might be unsure of what things to include in sensory play though. In order to help you out we found this article with 9 different things to include in your child’s sensory play. We hope it helps!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge speech therapist! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Rocking Chair
A lot of sensory or autistic kids love to rock back and forth, let them feel safe and sound in their very own kid’s rocking chair!

Sit ‘n Spin
A sit and spin is a great toy for the kids who just love to spin in circles. They can sit on it and make themselves go round and round and round… I get dizzy just thinking about it!

Therapy/Exercise Ball
There are lots of sensory things you can do with an exercise ball. My son has been doing these for years and we still keep an exercise ball in our sensory room for him to bounce on and play with. Here are a just a few things you can do for sensory input:

– Give squishes with therapy ball
– Rolling on stomach on top of ball
– Bounces up and down while seated on ball

Trampoline
The trampoline is a great way for your sensory child to get input and for any kid to get the wiggle-worms out! My son will go and jump when he needs it or sometimes if I can see he is having trouble I will tell him to go jump 10 times. He likes it when we count his jumps! We love it and it’s been perfect for my son’s needs.

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Looking for more ways for sensory play? Checkout this article about sensory play that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.singingthroughtherain.net/2014/09/sensory-room.html

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