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Summer 2014 Learning Lab Group Program

Summer 2014 Learning Lab Group Program

Access to Better Communication is offering a Learning Lab group program for the summer 2014. This group will work to create better learners and students by using visual strategies to develop improved executive functioning, reading, and writing while interacting with peers in a small group setting. Executive Functioning (E.F.) represents a group of skills that an individual uses to better focus on and process multiple sets of information at the same time and revise plans as necessary. Students who have E.F. deficits (also referred to as Executive Dysfunction) demonstrate weaknesses in areas including writing, organization, time management, initiation of tasks, and planning, which impact overall academic performance and activities of daily living.

Focused topics will include:

  • Initiation/planning for writing: We have discovered that many students with E.F. challenges have difficulty when assigned a writing task. “Getting started” can sometimes be the hardest part. These students struggle with reading a prompt, steps for prewriting, developing outlines, and writing the introduction.
  • Self-awareness and monitoring in group tasks: By participating in a small group setting, we are able to incorporate aspects of “Social Thinking®” with these traditionally “academic only” students. The students will learn how to monitor one’s self for “time robbers,” how to participate cooperatively in a group, and how to monitor one’s own attention to group discussions and projects. Many teachers are reporting this to be a tough skill for students, particularly those with EF difficulties who also have a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD.
  • Time management/organization for long-term projects and group tasks: Time management skills will be targeted through small group and individual tasks, as well as project planning. Students will learn how to estimate the amount of time it takes to complete an assignment, break the assignment into smaller steps, and execute those steps within a deadline so that they may complete assignments and projects from start to finish.
  • Reading comprehension and note taking: Students will learn to improve reading comprehension through strategies such as “visual mapping,” “information chunking,” “if/then thinking,” and summary writing. Students with E.F. weaknesses often have difficulty being concise and narrowing in on the most important information.

In summary, ABC’s Learning Lab group program is an opportunity for students to develop greater independence, organization, and time management skills over the summer that will be applicable in the academic setting. Opportunities for further enhancing these skills throughout the school year will be discussed at the end of this 8 week program.

For more information regarding ABC’s Learning Lab group program, please contact Kelli Renfro, Speech-Language Pathologist at (225) 930-0208 or email her directly at kelli@abclouisiana.com.

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Looking for Ways to Discipline Your Toddler? Get Ideas Here!

Discipline is never easy. There are different ways to do it. Some work better on some kids rather than others. Others forms parents don’t like for one reason or another. If you’re trying to come up with effective ways to discipline your toddler then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article with ideas we hope will be effective for you and your toddler.

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge speech therapist! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Is your 3-year-old’s behavior getting out of hand? Check out our unique way of making day-to-day tasks with your toddler easier.

Diplomat, interpreter, stylist, shepherd…and sometimes Danica Patrick?! Yup. Master these six who-knew jobs, and life with your toddler will be easier and more rewarding.

Interpreter
orientation:While communication skills really take off between 18 months and 3 years, that doesn’t necessarily make a 2-year-old easy to understand. Toddlers tend to get, er, uptight when you can’t figure out what they’re saying. Hence the need to hone your foreign-language translation skills. (Does “nana” mean “I want a banana” or “Call Nana”?)

overheard at the watercooler:My son once asked me, very seriously, “Where does love go?” Wow. I tried to concoct a response, and as I rambled, he got more upset. Finally, my daughter stepped in: “He’s asking, ‘Where is Lava Girl?’” That’s his action-figure toy. Oh.

job description:To help you understand each other better, keep your phrases short and repeat yourself often. Watch your child’s gestures and tone of voice—especially important when he’s frustrated. Even if you have no idea what he’s yelling about, show him you understand he’s angry. Give names to his emotions, by saying things like “You seem upset,” suggests Carol Weitzman, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine. When you give him the words, he can label the scary feeling himself and internalize the word for next time. You’ll also need to trot out your interpreting talents whenever your diction-challenged little kid tries to talk to a civilian.

Diplomatorientation:Two- and three-year-olds are sweet little angels. Then they turn into ruthless overlords faster than you can open a bag of fruit snacks. They demand, then kick and scream if they don’t get what they want. Now. It can be a delicate process getting yours to do the most basic tasks—eat, sleep, get into the car seat—and you’re likely to be met by loud and sometimes violent objections.

overheard at the watercooler:To get her 3-year-old daughter, Emily, to go to the bathroom, Rebecca Horvath of Bluff City, TN, used the power of suggestion. “I’d casually tell her that we’d go to the potty before we left the mall,” Horvath says. “Then I’d mention it a couple of times as we went from store to store, and at the food court. Then she’d go without a fight before we left. It seemed more like a fact than something Mommy wanted her to do.”

job description:
Stay calm. All is lost if you melt down, too. Get down to her level and talk slowly, acknowledging the obstacle: “Swinging is fun. But it’s time for lunch.” Patience is required, but also strategy. For example, offer three snack options of your choosing. Making your toddler think something is her idea? That’s diplomacy in action.

Shepherd
orientation:As much as you try to channel your inner 2-year-old—approaching stoplights, fluffy cats and talking toys as if they were all brand-new—you can’t dwell in the now. This is because you have places to be and things to do. Make no mistake: Keeping a toddler on track takes a village. A patient, understanding, tolerant village.

overheard at the watercooler:It took an hour to coax my 2-year-old to walk six blocks home from daycare. Ants! Pebbles! Cracks! Is that an acorn? Everything had to be examined and, maybe, tasted.

job description: Klein suggests scheduling in extra time to get from place to place. “You can’t be ready in five minutes with a toddler,” she says. “Try giving reasonable and concrete warnings, like ‘Add two more blocks to your house and then we’re putting on your shoes.’” And if you’re really in a rush, physically block distractions. You’re bigger; she won’t see the puppy if you’re standing in the way. She can pet the one you see tomorrow.

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Looking for ways to teach your toddler articulation? Checkout this article about toddler articulation that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.parenting.com/article/toddler-discipline-tricks-work?socsrc=parentingpin_20160111154131

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Looking to Create a Schedule for Your 2 Year Old? Get Ideas Here!

Having structure is important regardless of the child’s age. Some might even argue that the younger they are the more important it is. If you’ve got a toddler and struggling to come up with a schedule that works best for you child then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article with information on creating a good schedule. We hope it helps!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

As an elementary school teacher I thrived on having a detailed daily schedule to structure our day. When I became a first time mom the schedule went out the window for awhile as I tried to figure out how to balance life and where to put things. My first child was a terrible sleeper, so often our mornings between 8-11am were where he got his best sleep… which meant that I never left the house til later in the day… if at all.

When my second and third kids came along for the most part our schedule had to stay consistent. Kids had school or scheduled events and a new baby got to just come along for the ride.

As my kids entered toddlerhood we typically started getting more sleep at night (although sometimes we didn’t) which meant we woke up earlier and got a more organized start to our day. I finally began to start having a more consistent schedule again and I loved it!

I’ve discovered that I am a much happier person when we have some sort of routine to our day and so are my kids!

The schedule I am sharing today would be my ideal schedule to keep most days… though it is usually interrupted with emergency trips to the doctor or last minute errands or school pick ups or whatnot.

This is NOT what actually happens in our day every day. I WISH it could though.

When we have regular days without anything crazy going on then this is the schedule I aim for! Below is my schedule. I’ll explain in more detail what each activity is underneath the schedule. We don’t do every activity on every line. The “::” sign indicates the options I pick between during that time frame. My preschooler goes to preschool some mornings and joins us for activities some mornings too. I also have a first grader who is at school all day and joins for activities in the late afternoon.

My Perfect 2-Year-Old Schedule

7am- Wake up

Though, in my perfect world the kids would sleep in until 8! :) I am grateful that they at least sleep til 7am (typically).

7:00-9:00am
Eat breakfast :: get dressed :: make lunches :: pack bags

Sensory play :: creative art time :: free play time (I clean up breakfast/put laundry in)

My first grader goes to school late morning so we are lucky to have extra time in the morning together. After we drop him off we usually go on an adventure. Somedays I am in the car doing drop offs from 8am-9:30am and none of these activities happen!

10:00am- Park trip :: nature walk/workout :: toddler playgroup/book club :: learning activities :: run errands

I host a toddler book club once a month in my home and a weekly park day for moms at local parks. I also host a preschool co-op some weeks. As you can see, our days vary a lot between 10am-12pm. We don’t do all of these activities, just one or two. Sometimes we’ll run a quick errand and also go to the park. On toddler book club or playgroup days we just do that between 10-12 and errands wait till the kids are in bed and my husband is home. A nature walk could be around our neighborhood or we might go hiking in the open space near our home. Often I will push my two younger kids (ages 4 & 2) in the double jogger and we’ll run to the park, play, and come home so that I can get a workout in.

12:00pm- Lunch & stories

I love reading books to the kids while they eat lunch! This week we are loving books by Eric Carle.

1:00pm- Naptime or quiet time (I work during this time or catch up on emails)

My toddler typically naps for 2 hours every day while my preschooler plays mostly quietly in her room (with occasional interruptions). Sometimes we skip naptime and go on an adventure instead!

3:00pm- Playtime outside

4:00pm- Snack and more outdoor play :: free indoor play or creative art time (if raining)

5:00pm- Independent play time (I work on dinner/putting laundry away or other stuff around the house)

The kids sometimes play games or do some of our favorite simple toddler play activities.

5:30pm- Dinner (might be later depending on what I am making)

6:00pm- Playtime/games together :: stories :: bath :: creative art time :: clean rooms

My kids don’t get a bath every day and sometimes we scrap this entire schedule and just watch a movie after dinner. We do try and do something creative and something together every night, in addition to cleaning.

7:00pm- Get ready for bed & stories

7:15pm- Bedtime (for my toddler, big kids go to bed at 8pm)

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Looking for ways to teach your toddler articulation? Checkout this article about toddler articulation that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.toddlerapproved.com/2015/05/my-perfect-schedule-for-2-year-olds.html

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Have a Child With Autism? Learn How Music can Help Here!

Music is something that’s universal. There are so many different kinds and artists that anyone can find something that they like. This is even true for people with autism. Music can also help someone with autism enhance their language. In order to help you out we found this article with more information. We hope it gives you and your child something to bond over!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge cognitive behavioral therapy! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Through my experience working with children with autism, on numerous occasions, I witnessed how music could enhance their speech, language and communication skills. Several times I noted that children with very little speech who had been described to me as almost non-verbal, could easily recall words from songs. I carried out research for a PhD at the University of Roehampton on the impact of music on speech and language for children with Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC).

It is not clear why music may enhance language learning for some children with ASC, although three possible reasons have been put forward in the literature with regard to the effects of music on speech and language. Firstly, music and language may share neurological resources, and that exposure to and involvement in music might increase the connectivity of the neural networks involved in the encoding of language. Secondly, the presence of music, or singing as opposed to speaking, may have an arousing effect within the autonomous nervous system. Finally, due to the unique way in which some children with ASC process sound, they may have a natural affinity with music; thus, through a process of association, words have a higher (or more coherent) perceptual profile when linked to melody. A combination of all three of these effects may explain why music can improve language learning for some children with ASC.

In sum, these findings provide evidence to show that singing can enhance verbal recall for some children with ASC, and as such, strengthen the claim that music should play a central role in education for children with autism.

7 Practical Tips on Integrating Music
With regard to how findings from my research can be of practical value to both parents and teachers, I include the following tips:

– Nearly a third of non-verbal children sing. Thus for children with very basic language skills, singing can be a fun way to learn new words and can encourage early language acquisition. This also shows some children find it easier to learn words in the form of a song than words in everyday speech, and demonstrates how music can be a powerful tool to improve speech and communication.

– For 50% of children in my study who could not recollect any words at all when they were narrated in the words only condition, the presence of music helped memory for words. This shows the importance of music in helping children with little language skills learn new words.

– Music appears to be the most effective for children at the level of one or two word sentences. Therefore especially for these children, encourage them to sing can improve their speech and understanding of words.
Music can help improve relationships and social skills for children with ASC. This is another reason why musical activities should be encouraged for children with autism.

– Words learned from songs can cross over into everyday life. So encouraging children to sing can actively increase their vocabulary. This is especially so for children at the level of one or two word sentences. Results from my questionnaire showed that parents and teachers reported that nearly a half of children at this level of linguistic ability used words from song in every-day life.

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: https://www.autismparentingmagazine.com/music-may-hold-the-key-to-enhancing-language-for-autistic-children-7-tips-for-integration/

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Does Your Child Have a Frontal Lisp? Learn Ways to Help Them Here!

Speaking with any kind of an impediment can be embarrassing and frustrating regardless of your age. If your child has a frontal lisp then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article with information on how to diagnose and what to do next. We hope it will be helpful to both you and your child!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

What Is a Frontal Lisp?
Let’s start at the beginning. A frontal lisp, also known as an interdental lisp, occurs when a child says the /s/ and /z/ sounds with the tongue pushed too far forward. This causes /s/ and /z/ to sound more like “th”. Frontal lisps are sometimes caused by tongue thrust, which is when the tongue is consistently too far forward, including during swallowing and at rest (when the tongue is not doing anything at all). Not all frontal lisps are caused by tongue thrust but some are. Tongue thrust requires additional types of therapy that are not discussed in this article. Today’s article will just focus on treatment for a plain old frontal lisp.

How Do You Treat Frontal Lisp?
I’m so glad you asked! Frontal lisp therapy can be broken down into six steps.

Step One: Assessment
The first thing you will need to do for frontal lisp therapy is to assess the lisp. You don’t need any standardized tests for this, you just need a lot of words for the child to say so you can evaluate which sounds have the lisp and which ones don’t. I recommend you test both the /s/ and /z/ in all word positions. This means testing when the sound is at the beginning, middle, and end of the word as well as in consonant clusters (blends) at both the beginning and end of the word. Simply have the child say words with the sounds in all of those different positions. If the child can read, just have him read word lists. If the child cannot read, you can have him label pictures that represent the words. Below are my word lists for /s/ and /z/ in all positions, or you can download my articulation cards which contain pictures of /s/ and /z/ words in the initial, medial, and final position as well as /s/ blends in the initial position of words. Just write down which words the child can say correctly and which words are lisped

Initial /s/
Say
See
Siren
Soap
Soup
Second
Simple
Sock
Sad
Soot
Sun
Sound
Soy

Medial /s/
Medicine
Motorcycle
Pieces
Pacifier
Castle
Whistle
Dinosaur
Glasses
Recycle
Pencil
Baseball
Popsicle

Final /s/
Base
Crease
Ice
Close (like opposite of far)
Moose
“s”
Kiss
Boss
Class
Bus
Mouse

Initial /s/ Blends
Smile
Smell
Small
Smooth
Swing
Sweet
Swim
Snake
Snow
Snack
Sticker
Stop
Stairs
Spoon
Spaghetti
Spider
Strawberry
Street
stripe

Final /s/ Blends
Coughs
Laughs
Forests
Tests
Claps
Tips
Wasps
Asps
Fox
Mix
Mask
Whisk
Asks
Whisks
Best
Lost

Initial /z/
Zebra
Zoo
Zipper
Zap
Zero
Zig zag
Zone

Medial /z/
Puzzle
Scissors
Bulldozer
Lizard
Wizard
Raisin
Tweezer
Desert
Present
Newspaper

Final /z/
Maze
Sneeze
Eyes
Nose
Lose
Fizz
Jaws
Fuzz
Cows
Boys

Step Two: Find a Natural Tongue Placement
Ok, take a look at your results. Was the child able to say the /s/ or /z/ sound correctly in any of those words? If so, that’s where you’re going to start! Have the child say that word (or words if the child had multiple words he could say) and ask him to feel where his tongue is for the /s/ sound when he says it. Talk about how the tongue is behind the teeth. Ask the child to tell you if his tongue tip is up or down. Either way is acceptable and some children do it with the tongue tip up behind the top front teeth and some do it with the tongue tip down behind the bottom front teeth. Make sure the child is saying the /s/ sound in the word in a very crisp, clear manner without any lisp. If he starts to lisp on it, try a different word. Practice this correct /s/ sound (in those words if necessary) until the child knows exactly what his tongue is doing. If the child does not have any correct productions after testing all of those words, you can either keep trying new words to try to find a good one, or try some elicitation techniques to get an /s/ without having a word that he can already produce correctly.

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Looking for more ways to encourage speech therapy at home? Checkout this article about speech therapy at home that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.learnwithplayathome.com/2014/09/speech-therapy-how-to-develop-your.html

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Curious What Speech Development Looks Like From Ages 4 to 11 Years Old? Find Out Here!

Speech is an important part of our development process as people and will serve us our entire lives. Knowing what happens when is important to know if your child needs a little extra help in a specific area. In order to help you out we found this article with the speech milestones a child should hit from ages 4 to 11. We hope it helps your child stay on track!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge cognitive behavioral therapy! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Child speech development: Between the age’s of 4-11 years your child’s speech sound development will be blossoming.

You will want to keep an eye on their speech sounds. Every sound develops at different ages.

4 Years (48 Months)
– Says these sounds correctly: h, w, m, n, b, p, f, d, t, k, g, y, “ng” (as in sing)

– 100 % intelligible = non-parent can understand everything the child says

– Use of the Cluster Reduction and most other phonological processes should be stopped

– Errors can still be common for the sounds: s, r, l, and “th” (as in this and that)

1st Grade (6-7 Years)
This is the age when most speech sounds are solidified. There should only be a few sounds that still give your child trouble.

– says these prior sounds correctly: h, w, m, n, b, p, f, d, t, k, g, y,”ng” (as in sing)

– and these sounds by age 6: l, v, j, “sh” (as in shoe), “ch” (as in chew)

– Speech is 100% understandable

– No longer uses any phonological processes

– Errors can still be common for the sounds: s, z, r, and “th” (as in this and with), but they should be developed by age 8

4th Grade – 5th Grade (9-10 Years) – (10-11 Years)
There should be no speech problems by this age. However, the most common sound to still have trouble with is the very stubborn “R” sound.

Help your child understand why it is important to correct this as soon as possible, so that he/she will be motivated to contintue working hard in speech therapy.

It can be very frustrating for the child, parents, and SLP to continue working on the same sound for years.

If your child is not error free he/she should be receiving speech therapy for any persistent error sounds because they have been proven to negatively impact children in later life.

Do whatever you can to keep your 5th grade student motivated to correct his/her error sound. No doubt, they have been working on the same sound for several years.

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Looking for more information on the development of speech? Checkout this article about speech development milestones that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: http://www.home-speech-home.com/child-speech-development.html

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As a Parent are You Looking for Ways to Care for Your Mental Help? Get Started Here!

All parents carry stress. Regardless of your child’s age this is a universal truth. Depending upon the age of our child the amount of stress can change. Another factor is what unique challenges your child faces. One of the challenges could be autism. If this describes you and you’re looking for ways to care for your own mental health then you’ve come to the right place. We found this article and we hope it helps you feel a little less stress in your daily life.

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Getting Support for Yourself IS Supporting Your Family

Just like most parents, parents of children with autism love and support their kids. They cherish their time together, and take pride in their child’s accomplishments. And, just as all parents are concerned about their children’s well-being, parents of children with autism worry for their child’s health, safety, and future.

Yet, while all parents face daily struggles, parents of children with autism undergo unique and heightened challenges that can increase the risk of experiencing anxiety, depression, self-doubt and stress.

It may not always be possible or feasible, given a family’s personal circumstances to regularly attend therapy sessions. If you find yourself needing support, but are unable to access a professional at this time, or you are simply having “one of those days,” here are 10 strategies that may help:

Remember to Breathe
Being a parent is filled with moments that can take your breath away. As a parent of a child with autism, it is understandable to sometimes feel heartbroken, frustrated or stressed. That does not make you a terrible person, or a bad parent. It makes you human. When you encounter a moment more stressful than normal, do your best to take a minute, breathe, and recognize that it will pass. Each moment can be a learning experience. Even if you do not gain any new information, at least you learn that you survived the moment to breathe again.

Education is Power
You will never learn everything, but you can learn something. Navigating the world of autism can be extremely daunting. There will always be more to learn, and the information will always change and progress. From the symptoms of the disorder itself, to the various service and treatment options, to the availability of funding sources, finding the best options for your child and your family can be intimidating and nerve-wracking. With each piece of knowledge you receive, you will be more prepared, and will gain confidence and comfort. You can be the best advocate, teacher, researcher and therapist for your child. By learning all you can, or surrounding yourself with those who can help, you can remove the worry and uncertainty that accompanies the unknown, feel supported and part of a community and confidently make the decisions that are best for you and your family.

Deal (Even if Not Ideal)
Just because something is not perfect or the way you expected, does not mean it is a failure. Attempt to find the positive, or successful aspect of everything, even if the only positive is that it is over.

Find Support
Often, parents of children with autism distance themselves from others. They may worry about how their struggles will be interpreted or perceived, or may be concerned about the safety of their family outside of the home environment. It is important to remember that your experiences are your own, but you are not alone. Making a connection where you can freely share your thoughts and feelings can be exceptionally important in reducing stress.

The pressures of being a parent, especially a parent of a child with special needs, can be overwhelming. The strategies above may not solve every issue, and each suggestion may not apply to all of you and your family’s needs. But, no matter what, it is important to make attending to your own feelings and well-being a top priority. Doing so may not only make challenges seem less daunting and reduce feelings of stress and sadness, but also lead to a more positive and healthy outlook. It is important to always remember that supporting yourself is supporting your family.

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Looking for ways to make parenting easier? Checkout this article about making parenting easier that could be of interest to you.
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Read the entire article here: https://www.autismparentingmagazine.com/taking-care-mental-health/

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Kelly Shay, M.A. CF-SLP

Kelly Shay - Baton Rouge Speech Therapist at Access to Better CommunicationKelly often says that a good pediatric Speech Language Pathologist embodies three attributes: patience, flexibility, and a great sense of humor. With Kelly’s open communication style, families are encouraged to play an integral role in their children’s therapy. She truly believes that each child is unique and their treatment plan should reflect that individuality.

Kelly has a special interest in early language development and children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Kelly earned a Bachelor of Education in Communication Sciences and Disorders from the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia and a Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. She is a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist and is currently working toward her Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) from the American Speech, Language, and Hearing Association (ASHA).

Through her graduate training, Kelly worked in a variety of settings gaining experience with craniofacial abnormalities, tracheostomies, Autism Spectrum Disorder, expressive and receptive language disorders, articulation disorders, and reading/writing disorders.

Kelly recently relocated to Baton Rouge. Her hobbies include spending time with family and friends and teaching swim lessons to people of all ages. She is also a self-diagnosed “foodie” and is always interested in trying new foods and restaurants.

Access to Better Communication is privileged to have Kelly as a part of our team. Kelly’s personal and professional experience working with children with disabilities and their families is visible in her enthusiasm and creativity.

Kelly can be reached by phone at 225-930-0208 or via email on our contact us page.

We look forward to working with you and your child! We’re here to help!

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Looking for Craft Ideas for This Summer? Take a Look at These!

Kids are home for the summer. Yeah! More time to spend together as a family. More time for the kids to get into mischief and be bored. In order to help you find ways to fill their time we found this article with eight different craft ideas. We hope it helps make memories and have your kids be less bored!

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Do you need an experienced, licensed, and caring speech therapist for your child in the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area? Look no further! Access to Better Communication is your #1 Choice for Baton Rouge behavioral therapy for children! Call us today at 225-930-0208 to schedule your initial consultation!
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From the article:

Looking for a way to add some bright and fun color to your crafting this Summer? These 8 ideas are great for adding just the right color and texture into your Summer décor. Take a look and see which one of these easy crafts you want to make first. I bet you’ll want to make all 8!

Weathered Beach Signs from Crafts By Amanda
beach

DIY Mailbox Planters from Second Chance To Dream
mailbox

Pool Noodle Luminaries from Create Craft Love
noodle

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Drink a lot of soda? Checkout this article about problems from drinking soda that could be of interest to you.
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For all the ideas click here: http://indiecrafts.craftgossip.com/2015/05/25/8-colorful-craft-to-make-for-summer/

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Looking for Age Appropriate Chore Ideas for Your Kids? Check These Ideas Out!

Looking for Age Appropriate Chore Ideas for Your Kids?  Check These Ideas Out!

Getting kids involved in the everyday cleaning of a home can be hard. Knowing what chores are age appropriate can also be hard. We found this article with information on why giving your kids chores are important as well as what chores are appropriate for each age group. We hope it helps in teaching your children to be contributing members of your household and that your house stays cleaner!

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From the article:

The Value of Chores for Children
Parenting expert Jim Fay, co-founder of the Love and Logic website, says we all need to feel needed and to know that we’re making a contribution — even kids. “But they can’t feel that way if they don’t have chores and make contributions to the family,” Fay says.

Roger W. McIntire, University of Maryland psychology professor and author of Raising Good Kids in Tough Times, says, “A child has to have some responsibilities.”

Chores for children ages 4 to 5

  • Any of the above chores, plus:
  • Make their bed
  • Empty wastebaskets
  • Bring in mail or newspaper
  • Clear table
  • Pull weeds, if you have a garden
  • Use hand-held vacuum to pick up crumbs
  • Water flowers
  • Unload utensils from dishwasher
  • Wash plastic dishes at sink
  • Fix bowl of cereal

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Looking for ways to make your child a better problem solver? Then checkout this article about teaching kids problem solving that could be of interest to you.
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For all the ideas click here: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/chores-for-children

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